Thursday, April 10, 2008

ADDENDUM AGAIN...

I'm even sadder today to lose the house on Madrid Street. It's more historically significant than I first thought. Just today, I received this letter...

Hi Carlos,
Sorry off topic from tours, but just about Casa Vizantina (Byzantine House) or the House on Madrid corner Penarubia. I have not attended your Binondo tour but actually did a partial study of this house (under cultural heritage management at UST Cultural Heritage Studies). Here's a part of my report with some pictures.

Statement of Significance:
The Casa Vizantina, made primarily of local hardwood, is aesthetically significant for being representative of the prevailing late 19th century Floral style bahay na bato in Binondo. The characteristics are evident in the delicate embellishments on the facade, including neo-Byzantine elements like slender colonettes and round wooden arches. The facade is significant for its use of quality Philippine hardwood and the workmanship involved in its creation. The facade and the house, forms part of an aesthetically and architecturally important street scape in San Nicolas, Binondo.

The house is important for its historic association with the development of Binondo as the prosperous center of commerce in 19th century Philippines. Moreover, it is associated with the rise of the principalia as the country opened up extensively to world trade. The house is one of the surviving three-storey structures from the 19th century that was once common in areas like Binondo that still retains most of its original fabric.

Partial History:
The house, along with the facade, built in 1890, was created by Don Lorenzo del Rosario. Don Lorenzo was a native principalia and one of the numerous building contractors in Binondo (De Viana, 2001). In 1886, he won the contract to renovate the Tribunal de Sangleyes. From 1914 to 1919, the house was leased out to Instituto de Manila to hold elementary and high school classes. It was a school until 1919 when the Instituto moved to its own building at Sampaloc and expand to become The University of Manila. Around after the second World War, the house was leased to various tenants.

The facade and the house forms part of the distinctive street scape of San Nicolas during its heyday, that has escaped the ravages of wars. The collective scale of the surviving structures are significant and reveal much about the history of San Nicolas and Binondo as the commercial capital of the country in the 19th century. On a broader scale, the structure reveals the context of the development of the Philippine economy during the later 19th century when the country opened itself to extensive world trade since the galleon trade ended. The cash crop economy presented more opportunities for entrepreneurial inhabitants from various parts of the country to economically prosper. This gave rise to the class of "Principalia", which included the educated Illustrados, who had more opportunities to study and travel. The period also saw the increased influx of foreign people, influences, and objects in the country that are revealed in the architecture of the later 19th century.

The attached pictures are from Instituto de Manila Annual The Golden Leaf.
Manila: Graduating Class, 1918 and 1920.

Sincerely,
Eliza Agabin

9 comments:

primavera said...

Yayay!!! Is there a way to salvage those round things? I really like those...

Arnold said...

Remember i emailed you about Rizal's 1st school in Binan - and how it was left to rot? we are losing some of this historical gems, unfortunately this has been happening for decades and I haven't seen any move from our government leaders -

I hope we can do what Singapore did to their old colonial houses. It would take a consolidated action from the Government, Private sector and groups to make something happen here.

Thanks for bringing this up on your site! mabuhay ka Carlos!

Anonymous said...

How much would it cost to deconstruct this building and reconstruct it at the Bagong Nayon? A million dollars including restoration? Would ten million dollars finance doing that with ten exquisite examples of Philippine heritage homes? If investors are prepared to spend billions of dollars at Bagong Nayon for yet more casinos and hotels, why not add something in that development to show real and authentic Philippine regional architectural heritage?

Cynthia said...

OMG, is that what it looked like before? Wow, it's like one of those old mansions in New Orleans.

Anyone know who's carting away the remnants?

RoRo said...

Gloom. How's that house now? Perhaps it would be very nice to preserve it, yet there's no way to do it, perhaps. Lol.

Anyway, lurve it.

Anonymous said...

well its located now at las casas filipinas de acuzar at bataan

nallagaredseyer83 said...

I have a question on those who oppose azucar in bataan. would like this house sit in its original location and rot away while waiting for restoration from the owners and the goverment rather than having it relocated and rebuilt in bataan? If having it in azucar is the only plausible way to do it. Then so be it! This is also my opinion on the Alberto House. Rather than have it waiting government restoration, why not have it in Bataan. I am sad that the house is just sitting there waiting for the "plan" of the local government.

Anonymous said...

I used to live in that house on 704 Madrid St. Binondo! My family rented part of the 2nd floor of the building. I remember peeking through that elaborate fan-shaped structure to look at the jeepneys passing by on the street. That was way back in 1970's when the building was well- maintained. It was also where they shot Burlesque Queen (Vilma Santos) back in the day (can't remember what year it was.
Im glad that the structure was restored. I would have been happier if it was not moved somewhere else.

Anonymous said...

I support mr acuzars move to relocate and restore the old houses. Better than leave it to rot or become a squatter palace